#ForSarah

Did you know you can triple a victim’s chance of survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) when you perform CPR and use an AED?

Call

Call 911 for emergency assistance

Push

Push as hard and fast as you can on the victim’s chest until someone comes to help

Shock

Shock the victim using the nearest AED by turning it on and following the voice prompts

CallPushShock.org

A national collaborative movement with a mission to motivate bystander CPR/AED action and increase sudden cardiac arrest survival.

Sarah doing CPR training with Dr. Vicki Vetter of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

What can YOU do to make a difference?

  • Learn these three steps by heart – and tell your friends and family about them too.
  • Take a CPR certification class in your local area; click here to find one.
  • Where’s the nearest AED you can find? Post your #SelfieWithAEDs online.
View our resources on CPR & AED use in schools.

Who is Sarah?

Diagnosed with Long QT Syndrome at age 5 after having a seizure in the middle of a swimming lesson, Sarah was placed on beta blockers and had continued clean bills of health. That’s why her family was in total shock when they lost her at age 21 to Sudden Cardiac Arrest. Sarah had always been so responsible with her health.

Sarah Katz was a beloved junior at the University of Pennsylvania. She was a Red Cap ambassador with the American Heart Association (AHA), where she taught CPR in high schools and underserved communities and organized teams for the Wall Street Run & Heart Walk. In recognition of her efforts, Sarah received awards from the AHA in 2013 and 2015. 

She also worked with Project ADAM and at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia as a research assistant – and introduced a bill to Pennsylvania state legislators advocating that all Pennsylvania schools become certified heart-safe spaces. 

Why is this campaign #ForSarah?

Since she was a little girl, Sarah was involved in CPR and AED awareness advocacy – and always wanted to help others learn how to save a life. She was in the process of bringing CPR training to Penn; her school friends carried on her efforts and held a CPR certification class after she passed away. Sarah is deeply missed by her friends, parents, and community – who believe her message of CPR and AED awareness is more important than ever. 

In honor and memory of beloved Sarah, please learn CPR in her honor – or donate to help us take action and make an impact in her memory.

I found this card and want to help spread the message!

Where is Sarah shining a light on CPR & AED awareness?

#forsarah

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